10 Best Ergonomic Mice for 2021

If you spend a long time at a computer desk your mouse will soon become uncomfortable to use. So, we’ve narrowed down 10 of the best ergonomic mouse solutions, looking at:

  • Price
  • Comfort and Ergonomics
  • Performance
  • Features

Whether you’re looking for the best vertical mouse, are a lefty, are a gamer, need a trackball or something to help with carpal tunnel syndrome, we’ve got you covered. Check out our quick list, in-depth reviews, and guides, so you can find the best ergo mouse for you.

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Top 10 Best Ergonomic Mouse for 2021

1. Logitech MX Master 3 Advanced Wireless Mouse

With a genuinely comfortable ergonomic design, this wireless mouse with an electromagnetic scroller can remain connected to multiple devices at once. It’s also easily the best wireless mouse for MAC users we’ve reviewed and one of the best mice for CAD. Full Review

  • Eight buttons
  • Works with 3 devices
  • Electromagnetic scroller

With a genuinely comfortable ergonomic design, this wireless mouse with an electromagnetic scroller can remain connected to multiple devices at once. It’s also easily the best wireless mouse for MAC users we’ve reviewed and one of the best mice for CAD. Full Review

2. Logitech MX Vertical Wireless Mouse

Our pick for the best ergonomic wireless mouse, the unique vertical shape makes the Logitech MX mouse super comfortable by supporting your arm, wrist, and hands. You can sync and swap between three different devices, making it a suitable Bluetooth mouse for laptops and other devices, while the battery will last between 6 and 8 weeks without needing to be charged. Full Review

  • Super comfortable vertical design
  • Long wireless battery life
  • Connect three wireless devices

Our pick for the best ergonomic wireless mouse, the unique vertical shape makes the Logitech MX mouse super comfortable by supporting your arm, wrist, and hands. You can sync and swap between three different devices, making it a suitable Bluetooth mouse for laptops and other devices, while the battery will last between 6 and 8 weeks without needing to be charged. Full Review

3. Evoluent VerticalMouse 4

A staple in the vertical mouse market for around a decade. With the Evoluent VerticalMouse 4, you can change your Dots Per Inch (DPI) on the fly. The accompanying graphical user interface allows you to change cursor speed, button shortcuts, and the responsiveness of the scroll wheel. Available for Windows and one of the best Mac mice, you can pick this up for $89.95 MSRP. Full Review

  • Plug and play wired
  • Comfortable vertical design
  • 6 programmable buttons

A staple in the vertical mouse market for around a decade. With the Evoluent VerticalMouse 4, you can change your Dots Per Inch (DPI) on the fly. The accompanying graphical user interface allows you to change cursor speed, button shortcuts, and the responsiveness of the scroll wheel. Available for Windows and one of the best Mac mice, you can pick this up for $89.95 MSRP. Full Review

4. Corsair Glaive PRO

Corsair provides a wired ergonomic and sensitive gaming mouse whose optical-sensor DPI can be switched up to 18,000 with their Glaive PRO model. There are at least 3 styles of grip depending on your personal comfort preferences. RGB lighting adds some excitement to the experience. Full Review

  • Multiple grip designs
  • 5 DPI settings
  • Genuinely good for gaming

Corsair provides a wired ergonomic and sensitive gaming mouse whose optical-sensor DPI can be switched up to 18,000 with their Glaive PRO model. There are at least 3 styles of grip depending on your personal comfort preferences. RGB lighting adds some excitement to the experience. Full Review

5. ZLOT Vertical Gaming Mouse

Not all vertical mice are suitable for gaming but with a high customizable DPI, the ZLOT has combined comfort and performance for just $29.99 MSRP. Hands down the best cheap mouse on our list. Not only that, but you get endless assignable buttons and a joystick, along with a guaranteed 10 million click and one-year warranty. Full Review

  • Up to 10,000 DPI
  • 11 programmable buttons
  • Comfortable wired vertical mouse

Not all vertical mice are suitable for gaming but with a high customizable DPI, the ZLOT has combined comfort and performance for just $29.99 MSRP. Hands down the best cheap mouse on our list. Not only that, but you get endless assignable buttons and a joystick, along with a guaranteed 10 million click and one-year warranty. Full Review

6. Contour Unimouse

Three main buttons accompanied by a customizable thumb rest and mouse angle makes this wireless mouse a good choice for comfort. Performance-wise, the Contour Unimouse has 10 speeds between 800dpi to 2,800dpi, making it good for everyday tasks. Its red and green LED lights to provide your DPI status and add some flair. One of the best wireless mouses. Full Review

  • Angled between 35-70 degrees
  • Dedicated thumb rest
  • Top-rated wireless mouse

Three main buttons accompanied by a customizable thumb rest and mouse angle makes this wireless mouse a good choice for comfort. Performance-wise, the Contour Unimouse has 10 speeds between 800dpi to 2,800dpi, making it good for everyday tasks. Its red and green LED lights to provide your DPI status and add some flair. One of the best wireless mouses. Full Review

7. Adesso iMouse E90

A trackball vertical ergonomic mouse with options for left-handers, the Adesso iMouse E90 is wireless, comfortable, with a tracking speed up to 1,600dpi. Further precision is guaranteed by an optical mouse sensor. The package comes with a wireless USB receiver and provides a range of up to 30 feet. Full Review

  • Designed for the left-handed
  • Affordable
  • 3 DPI levels

A trackball vertical ergonomic mouse with options for left-handers, the Adesso iMouse E90 is wireless, comfortable, with a tracking speed up to 1,600dpi. Further precision is guaranteed by an optical mouse sensor. The package comes with a wireless USB receiver and provides a range of up to 30 feet. Full Review

8. Razer Basilisk Ultimate

For $169.99 you can get a feature-rich wireless mouse with great thumb support and an overall comfortable design. It comes with a stylish charging dock and is suitable for precision gaming with up to 20,000dpi, 11 programmable buttons, and FPS-friendly sniper paddle. Full Review

  • Stable lag-free wireless
  • 100-hour battery life
  • 11 synapse buttons/ 5 profiles

For $169.99 you can get a feature-rich wireless mouse with great thumb support and an overall comfortable design. It comes with a stylish charging dock and is suitable for precision gaming with up to 20,000dpi, 11 programmable buttons, and FPS-friendly sniper paddle. Full Review

9. Posturite Penguin Ambidextrous Wireless Ergonomic Mouse

Most mice are designed for right-handed users with the odd left-hand specific design. The Posturite Penguin goes full ambidextrous with their wireless model that sells between $69 and $89. You get a trackball, a comfortable vertical shape, and 3 main buttons. It’s also suitable for people with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Full Review

  • Suitable for lefties and righties
  • Trackball functionality
  • DPI up to 1,200

Most mice are designed for right-handed users with the odd left-hand specific design. The Posturite Penguin goes full ambidextrous with their wireless model that sells between $69 and $89. You get a trackball, a comfortable vertical shape, and 3 main buttons. It’s also suitable for people with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Full Review

10. Logitech MX Ergo Wireless Trackball Mouse

For $100 Logitech has provided a great wireless trackball mouse called the MX Ergo thanks to its changeable tilt level depending on your preference. It comes with 8 programmable buttons, a 320 to 440 DPI range, and an overall premium build. It’s a the best mouse for graphics design users. Full Review

  • Horizontal and semi-vertical orientation
  • Trackball functionality
  • Sturdy and well built

For $100 Logitech has provided a great wireless trackball mouse called the MX Ergo thanks to its changeable tilt level depending on your preference. It comes with 8 programmable buttons, a 320 to 440 DPI range, and an overall premium build. It’s a the best mouse for graphics design users. Full Review

The Best Ergonomic Mouse for 2021

Having taken a hands-on look at the best ergonomic mice, we found the winners:

Detailed Reviews

Logitech MX Master 3 Advanced Wireless Mouse
Logitech MX Master 3 Advanced Wireless Mouse
Logitech MX Master 3 Advanced Wireless Mouse

BEST FOR

Overall, best ergonomic mouse

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  • Eight buttons
  • Works with 3 devices
  • Electromagnetic scroller
  • Top wireless mouse

The third incarnation of the Logitech ergonomic mouse, known as the MX Master, further refines its shape for maximum comfort and adds an electromagnetic scroll wheel. This time around their focus has also been on speed and control, not just how it feels in your hand. This is much more than just a good mouse. It excels in every area and works with Windows and macOS.

The scroll wheels have a mode button just beneath it that allows you to switch between traditional free-wheel and then a more accurate ‘precision mode’. In practice what this means is you feel some feedback through the metal wheel. It’s much less likely that you’ll over scroll. The magnetization also seems to have created a form of dynamic resistance that works surprisingly well.

If you scroll slowly it goes exactly with your finger, but if you start wildly flicking it, you’ll go much faster than a regular wheel. It’s hard to describe but whatever’s going on in there is intuitive and works great for those that need to browse documents and the web all day for work.

On the underside, the dots per inch (DPI) has been improved to 4,000dpi, which doesn’t quite meet modern gaming standards but is a lot better than your average mouse. Afterall, this isn’t marketed as a gaming mouse. Plus, Logitech’s Darkfield sensor is a lot more responsive and accurate than the generic kind. It’s still going to be good for the average gamer that isn’t obsessed with first-person shooters and easily in contention for the best PC mouse for everyone else.

Design-wise it’s not a full vertical mouse but it passes the comfort test in spades. It’s tall and soft enough to give added wrist support and the extended thumb rest is perfect. It measures 2 by 3.3 by 4.9 inches which suited multiple hand sizes in our office.

It’s also a great glider, advertised as not needing a mouse mat. We can vouch that it works well on everything from glass tables to wood, to leather.

For many of these reasons, it’s considered the best mouse for AutoCAD and other CAD applications.

Overall, there are 8 buttons: 

  • the two main left and right
  • the clickable scroll wheel and its mode switcher
  • a second scroll wheel on the side if you prefer to use your thumb
  • two programmable shortcut buttons  
  • a gesture button 

The gesture one must be held down while you move the mouse to give you at least 4 extra inputs.

As a wireless mouse, you always have to consider battery life and connection strength. The MX Master 3 has all the battery life in the world (up to 70 days) and multiple connection modes. You can use Bluetooth or the 2.4GHz adapter with zero lag, making it the best Bluetooth gaming mouse we’ve reviewed.

Just keep in mind there are certainly better non-Bluetooth gaming mice on the list, so don’t get hung up on Bluetooth.

If in doubt with any of this, you can plug in the USB-C and use it as a wired mouse anyway.

Where this model particularly stands out is its ability to connect over 3 wireless channels to 3 devices simultaneously for seamless switching.  I.e. you can take the mouse from your desktop in one room, run over to your laptop in the other room, and a third device elsewhere and it will be instantly recognized. Just flick the device switch at the bottom of the mouse near the sensor.

The mouse also comes with some interesting software that allows you to set profiles for different software, like your browser, Microsoft Word, or a particular game. Personally, we didn’t play around with this too much. There are some presets for some programs, but we think the mouse works great without spending (perhaps wasting) time fine-tuning it for different applications. 

If you want a class-leading ergonomic computer mouse that doesn’t drastically change the traditional fundamentals, the Logitech MX Master 3 Advanced Wireless is our overall top pick. At $200, it is also the most expensive mouse on our list.

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Logitech MX Vertical Wireless Mouse
Logitech MX Vertical Wireless Mouse
Logitech MX Vertical Wireless Mouse

BEST FOR

Best wireless vertical mouse

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  • Super comfortable vertical design
  • Long wireless battery life
  • Connect three wireless devices
  • 4,000dpi tracking

You either love or hate vertical mice but there’s no denying their comfort. We particularly love this entry from Logitech that can be picked up for a respectable $100 online. The tradeoff for such a comfortable design is perhaps less productivity but if you experience pain or other issues with regular mouse designs, these are the best mice for you. It’s also one of the best wireless mice in this segment.

This particular model is a full-on vertical. While the base keeps the usual oval flatness, the top curves round to essentially a vertical shape like a teardrop, with the right-hand side containing the left and right buttons and mouse wheel

It has all the same buttons and functions, such as drag and drop, mouseover, and you can do every gesture that a normal mouse can do.

In effect this just means you handle what’s usually straight on top of the mouse on the side like you’re shaking someone’s hand. You get extra thumb support which leads to wrist and arm support on the left-hand side.   

This removes the unnatural twisting that you have to do to your arm and wrist when using a regular mouse, which you grip with your thumb and pinky finger. 

This ergonomic teardrop shape makes it more akin to pushing a fat joystick around than a mouse, which takes some getting used to and may slow you down. Trust us, your joints will thank you later.

The design is taller than it is in width, with an HWD of 4.94 by 3 by 3.34 inches. It also has a wavy/ribbed surface for grip and intuitive finger placement. 

Above the deeply curved thumb rest is a two in one macro button for programming shortcuts. If you lift your thumb up to the middle strip there’s another programmable button. This is best used for switching between DPI presets which in this case allows you to go up to 4,000dpi. This is great for everyday use and some gaming, though the mouse shape itself doesn’t lend itself to intense games like shooters. This is more for workers that need extra support not gamers.

It certainly takes some getting used to having to click from a sideways angle and use a scroll wheel like a trigger but after a few days, it becomes second nature. You really begin to realize how much stress your joints and muscles are usually under, especially if you work all day long at a desktop.

There’s no sugar coating that tracking accuracy is a little off. This is most likely because of the shape itself and not the sensor since Logitech doesn’t scrimp on its technology. Wireless mouse reviews still heap praise on this model.

For the average user, this isn’t a dealbreaker, but for the aforementioned gamers and perhaps some photo and video editors, it will be. The precision just isn’t quite there.

The MX Vertical is wireless and comes with a USB dongle that supports Bluetooth and RF, making it one of the best Bluetooth mouse options on our list. We didn’t notice any particular lag. If you use the charging USB cable that comes in the box you can keep it wired if you’re at a desktop anyway.

You also get a brilliant battery life of between 6 and 8 weeks with regular daily usage. You can benefit from the accompanying software to easily remap your buttons – perhaps you want to drag with the right mouse button or use mouse chording. You can also change the DPI but it does not support different profiles like its cousin the MX Master.

All things considered, this is the best wireless mouse in the vertical design and the best Logitech vertical mouse. We cannot stress how comfortable it really is.

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Evoluent VerticalMouse 4
Evoluent VerticalMouse 4
Evoluent VerticalMouse 4

BEST FOR

Wired vertical mouse

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  • Plug and play wired
  • Comfortable vertical design
  • 6 programmable buttons
  • Best mouse for MAC

At just $89.95 MSRP, the VerticalMouse 4 from Evoluent is easily the best vertical mouse that is only let down because it has to be wired. But, if you sit at a desk anyway, then it’s not such a problem. And, it’s more than a fair trade-off for one of the most comfortable mouse experiences you might ever have.

Far from slapping the term ergonomic on the side of the box and hoping for the best, this is the fourth incarnation of a carefully crafted full vertical mouse that allows your hand and arm to use a more natural handshake grip.

The main buttons and scroll wheel are vertically placed on the right-hand side and are pressed and scrolled more like triggers than pushing downwards. Your thumb gets a large crevice on the left to rest and keep all of your joints in optimal alignment.

It can be described as a teardrop, fat joystick, or a more curved and comfortable version of a table hockey handle. But, it’s definitely superior ergonomically to a traditional mouse. 

This particular model also recognizes that people have different sized hands, providing a small and regular size, as well as a flipped version for left-handers in the regular size. 

Being one of the best vertical designs isn’t Evoluent’s only selling point. You get plug-and-play functionality, three main buttons, and additional software to tweak things to your personal liking. There’s also a light indicated DPI switcher so you can get the exact tracking/responsiveness you desire. 

It also has Mac support and we rate it as the best mouse for Macbook Pro users who want an ergonomic separate mouse.

The DPI switcher is conveniently below the three main mouse buttons – the third of the two being a single-click for double-click function. On the other side, near the thumb rest, you also get two browser buttons.

Pre-set infrared DPI settings are 600, 1000, and 1600dpi. The latter is good if you want a fast and responsive experience doing day-to-day activities. However, it’s not suitable for intense gaming that requires a faster and more precise mouse. This is about comfort not gunning down your enemy first.

Although it’s plug-and-play you can also opt to download the accompanying software. It allows you to adjust the speed of your cursor, reassign buttons, and a few other basic settings.

The build quality is great; a combination of weighty plastic, rubber where it counts, and a good under surface for smooth navigation. Our only qualm is it can attract dust and dirt, but it’s fine if you keep on top of wiping it down.

Beyond instructions, there are no extras in the box as the mouse is permanently wired and must be connected to your computer via USB.

Vertical mice always take some getting used to but after a week you’ll be using this like second nature and realizing how much better it is for your joints. 

Ultimately, it just feels more natural and any productivity lost in the acclimatization phase is soon gained back by the fact that you can use it for longer sessions. One of the best computer mouse options in this category.

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Corsair Glaive PRO
Corsair Glaive PRO
Corsair Glaive PRO

BEST FOR

Budget ergonomic gaming mouse

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  • Multiple grip designs
  • 5 DPI settings
  • Genuinely good for gaming
  • Just $100

It’s odd that for an activity that can get intense and last for hours that ergonomics tends to be a secondary concern over bright lights and precision. With the Corsair Glaive PRO RGB gaming mouse, you get both comfort and a top-quality gaming experience. And you can buy it all for around $100, which is quite affordable when it comes to gaming mice.

So, to start with, what makes this ergonomic (a.k.a more comfortable)? First of all, it has a more contoured and curvy shape than a standard mouse to better fit the shape of your hand. It’s not a vertical mouse, but it’s still more comfortable to use than the average.

Furthermore, you get ‘customizable comfort’. This means you can stick with the standard shape with nice rubber grips on either side or choose between two other grip styles on the left-hand side where your thumb rests. These 3 options can best be described as:

  • Narrow: Allowing a tighter grip for smaller hands or for added precision in-game, though the trade-off is less comfort.
  • Regular: More of a bulky padding, that also extends further along the length of the mouse. This is the default fitting and works well.
  • Extended: This creates a scope or ‘fin’ that gives your thumb more room to rest while remaining in fully gripped control. This is the most comfortable option but will slightly reduce performance in games like FPSs.

Although it all comes down to personal tastes, you could, for example, use the narrow grip for an intense and precise shooter, the normal grip for more relaxed games, and the extended grip for work and day-to-day tasks.

Where the mouse stands out for gamers is its impressive 18,000 top DPI, giving you all of the speed and precision you need. Corsair’s iCUE software, of course, allows you to fine-tune the DPI to your liking, going as low as 100dpi. You can also remap the buttons, generate new macros/shortcuts, choose different settings for different surfaces. You can program the awesome RGB lighting that shoots up each side and 5 DPI indicators to let you know what profile/setting you are using.

RGB lighting also illuminates the palm rest logo and can be seen inside the scroll wheel.

In total there are 7 buttons. At the front, you get the left and right main mouse buttons with a comfortable and responsive rubber-coated wheel in between that’s also clickable. Behind these are up and down DPI switchers, and then down by the thumb area are two programmable paddles within easy reach.

Performance-wise we couldn’t fault it, though you will need a game mat or surface for the best response. In Call of Duty using the regular grip, we had no trouble with the responsiveness and precision and felt like this and the thinner grip would suit any shooter or intense MOBA game.

We also tested the extended grip for a day’s work in the office. It felt a lot smoother and forgiving than a standard mouse. 

Ultimately, if you are a gamer that wants some extra comfort then we highly recommend this mouse. Especially, if you use the same mouse for other day-to-day activities. If, however, you’re looking for an ergonomic mouse because of joint issues, carpal tunnel, RSI, etc, you’ll want something more akin to a vertical mouse to really notice the difference.

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ZLOT Vertical Gaming Mouse
ZLOT Vertical Gaming Mouse
ZLOT Vertical Gaming Mouse

BEST FOR

Vertical mouse on a budget

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  • Up to 10,000 DPI
  • 11 programmable buttons
  • Comfortable wired vertical mouse
  • Suitable for gaming

When it comes to gaming mice, the vertical design is not usually something that comes to mind but ZLOT may have just been able to pull it off with their extremely affordable $29.99 model. We think it’s the best-corded mouse.

The truth is, especially for older gamers or those prone to joint pain and discomfort, your typical mouse design just doesn’t cut it for those day-long sessions. A vertical mouse, like that from ZLOT offers a more natural handshake grip that supports the forearm and ulna bone, without lacking in buttons and features.

The main benefit over a regular vertical mouse is they’ve spent time fine-tuning the sensor and upping the DPI to a respectable 10,000, which is good for gaming. It’s about the highest you’ll find for a vertical mouse. That means excellent response and precise movement in games that require it, and the switcher allows you to move between 5 DPI presets depending on the style of the game and your personal taste. It also has a brilliant 125-1000Hz response rate.

It also supports some pretty cool RGB lighting effects, with a band of light around the circumference towards the bottom of the device and lights on the top to denote what DPI mode you are on.

In total there are 11 programmable buttons

  • the two main left and right clickers which are now vertical and on the right-hand side
  • a clickable rubber mouse wheel, with the DPI modifier key behind it 
  • forward and back buttons by the thumb rest
  • WSAD (up, down, left, right) which is controlled by a mini joystick at the top
  • if you click the above one in you get another function, which by default is the space bar

While it’s a wired-only mouse, we don’t necessarily see the need for it to be portable since it’s aimed at Windows and Linux desktop gamers. Perhaps the only downside is that the joystick is really just a mapped d-pad and does not support 8 directions or a separate Y or X-axis.

If you don’t mind the coloring, not only is this one of the best vertical gaming mice, it’s actually one of the most affordable ones. So, if you need it for office work, go ahead, because the comfort is sublime.  

The ZLOT vertical gaming mouse comes with a 1-year manufacturer’s warranty and is guaranteed for 10 million button clicks and 1.2 million wheel turns.

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Contour Unimouse
Contour Unimouse
Contour Unimouse

BEST FOR

Customizable ergonomic wireless mouse

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  • Angled between 35-70 degrees
  • Dedicated thumb rest
  • Top-rated wireless mouse
  • 5 buttons, 3 programmable

The Contour Unimouse is somewhere in between a regular mouse and a vertical mouse in a design now commonly called ‘the tilt’. Instead of going completely vertical, you can adjust it between 35 and 70 degrees, while the thumb rest can also be adjusted to your liking. 

This makes it the best mouse for photoshop and other precision software while offering superior comfort.

This model is one of the most customizable options on the market and provides those who aren’t fully convinced by vertical mice a middle-ground to try out. We like it because it’s genuinely comfortable and the adjustments are simple and effective.

The thumb rest itself can be extended and retracted depending on the size of your hand. It can also go forward and back along the mouse, depending on the length of your thumb and where you feel most comfortable. You can even rotate it if you prefer your thumb to be at more or an angle, though this setting is the least useful.

For $79.99, these adjustments alone make it a good prospect for those looking for a more ergonomic experience and to tame their carpal tunnel or joint aches. You can also pick up a more expensive wireless version, though there is no option for the left-handed. 

The Unimouse comes with 5 buttons in total, three of which are programmable. There are the three main buttons above the palm, a click of the rubber covered wheel, and a two-in-one above the thumb rest to cycle up and down through 10 DPI speed settings.

These range from 800dpi to 2,800dpi, so it’s not quite responsive enough for the modern gamer. However, is more than capable of giving you your preferred personalized speed for day-to-day tasks and office-style work. Red and green lights let you know what setting you’re on, which is helpful albeit a bit annoying.

Unlike some ergonomic mice, the Contour Unimouse does not have a radically different vibe and essentially just looks like a normal mouse opened like a clam. 

Compared to others on our list, the build quality could be better. It’s light, plastic, and can feel flimsy at times. 

Our only other complaint is with the clunky accompanying software that is supposed to help you alter the pointer speed, wheel scroll sensitivity, and remap the 3 main buttons. However, it’s far from intuitive and it cannot create macro shortcuts. Sometimes it even just forgets what you previously saved, which knocks off half a star.

Overall, it’s priced ok and has the right idea in terms of finding a reasonable middle-ground between the often-off-putting vertical mice and uncomfortable traditional mouse. However, it’s meant to replace a normal mouse, not a gaming mouse. If you want to remap the buttons from their defaults it could start getting annoying thanks to buggy software. We’re sure the tech-savvy will find a way around this though. 

Outside of gaming, its middle-of-the-road approach makes it the best mouse for designers on our list.

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Adesso iMouse E90
Adesso iMouse E90
Adesso iMouse E90

BEST FOR

Left handed ergonomic mice

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  • Designed for the left-handed
  • Affordable
  • 3 DPI levels
  • No mouse mat needed

A cheap computer mouse at $60 provides a wireless vertical design and is surprisingly sturdy and well-built. It’s also one of the few to provide an equally as good left-handed version. We liked it so much it’s our top pick for lefties in the vertical format.

It’s sleekly designed with some nice elements and a mixture of shiny and matte black finish. As wireless mice go, we had little to no lag, and it’s guaranteed up to 30 feet from the USB dongle receiver. A nice touch is that the dongle can be neatly tucked in behind the mouse for easy portability.

It also has great battery life, lasting at least 3 months after a full charge with daily use.

In terms of buttons, it doesn’t overdo it, with two backwards and forwards buttons on the thumb rest side of the mouse, the two main left and right clickers on the opposite side, and a clickable scroll wheel in the middle. 

There is also a DPI button to go through three pre-sets up to 1,600dpi, making it great for everyday use but not fast enough for a lot of intense gaming. The button itself is useful because it saves you the hassle of going to your Windows settings or the Adesso software when you want a finer or coarser cursor. 

One thing worth pointing out is the iMouse E90 is oddly large and is often not suitable for people with smaller hands. However, we can’t fault the fact that they offer an option for left-handed people.

Comfort-wise, it has the obvious benefit of being a vertical mouse which is naturally more comfortable than a traditional mouse. Nonetheless, it’s not quite as good as some of the others on our list. Not only is it a bit too large as noted, but it also lacks extra padding or grip.

Ultimately, for $60 the Adesso iMouse E90 is a cheap mouse that could easily be priced higher despite a few issues. This value for money is only increased when you factor in its left-handed support.

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Razer Basilisk Ultimate
Razer Basilisk Ultimate
Razer Basilisk Ultimate

BEST FOR

Overall ergonomic gaming mouse

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  • Stable lag-free wireless
  • 100-hour battery life
  • 11 synapse buttons/ 5 profiles
  • Razer Chroma lighting

The Basilisk Ultimate by Razer is quite expensive as far as ergonomic mice go but it’s also an accomplished gamer mouse, so $169.99 MSRP is not so out of the ordinary. There’s no denying that it’s a comfortable, well-built, and high-performing device. It also comes with a charging dock allowing you to slot it away to charge whenever you’re finished.

If you’re a fan of Razer’s existing line of Basilisk mice, then the Ultimate has a familiar look. It is designed perfectly for first-person shooters and other games. It has an unrivaled sensor and 20,000dpi for super-fast, responsive, and precise aiming, and with 11 synapse programmable buttons, anything you could need in your game is literally at your fingertips.

Its traditional yet comfortable design has two left and right clickers on the top with a large clickable scroll wheel, and an up and down DPI settings button pair just behind. There are two shortcut buttons and Razer’s patented sniper paddle for FPSs.

The Ultimate’s ergonomic design allows this to be removed entirely if you find your grip is better without it.

Then, on the underside, you’ll find a button that switches between the Synapse software’s own preset profiles and a dial to alter the sensitivity of the scroll wheel. You won’t need to open any Windows or Razer software to configure.

One upgrade from previous models is the ability to tilt the scroll wheel left and right for another two button functions. The possibilities for this are endless, but for non-gamers, it’s a great way to go back and forth through tabs, whole document, or digital book pages. 

For the gamers, Razer has upgraded its left and right clickers to be ‘esports ready’ and the same buttons can be found on their earlier Viper model. This means microseconds of a response increase which might not mean a lot unless you are a competitive gamer, but it’s still pretty neat.

It’s also absolutely lag-free. Not just ‘rarely experiences lag’ or ‘does well when you don’t get too far away’. Forget Bluetooth too, Razer have implemented a whopping 1,000Hz polling via its ‘hyperspeed’ radio-frequency (RF) wireless technology

To you and me that means its wireless USB dongle is at the top of its class and there’s no need to wire it up at all.

So, what makes it so ergonomic? While it’s definitely not a vertical or even a tilted mouse, care has been taken to make it perfectly shaped for palm and fingers. It comes with an extra lip or wing for use as a thumb rest so you aren’t gripping so hard and can let your thumb loose on the rubber padding without losing control.

Since this is Razer we’re dealing with, you can bet that there’s some trusty RGB Chroma lighting to have fun with. In this case, there are lines across the length of the mouse on either side of the main clickers, light coming out of the scroll wheel, and the palm logo lights up as well. 

Battery life isn’t the best, but with all those features, the advertised 100 hours and more realistic 3 or 4 days is more than acceptable. Besides, you can just leave it in its charging dock when not in use.

Overall, the Razer Basilisk Ultimate is a superb wireless gaming mouse with enough ergonomic features to make your experience a lot more comfortable than most gaming mice. However, this isn’t something you’d buy for carpal tunnel syndrome or arthritis.

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Posturite Penguin Ambidextrous Wireless Ergonomic Mouse
Posturite Penguin Ambidextrous Wireless Ergonomic Mouse
Posturite Penguin Ambidextrous Wireless Ergonomic Mouse

BEST FOR

Carpal tunnel

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  • Suitable for lefties and righties
  • Trackball functionality
  • DPI up to 1,200
  • 3 size options

The Posturite Penguin Ambidextrous Wireless is a bit of an anomaly even in the vertical mouse world. It’s shaped more like a fat joystick (or yes, even a penguin). As the name also suggests, it can be used equally as effectively in both the right and left hand because it’s ambidextrous.

Dare we say it’s the most ergonomic mouse available? It’s certainly a contender and one of the best Mac mouses in this category.

We were particularly impressed with the maker’s honest attempt at moving ergonomics technology forward, offering small, medium, and large versions. Not everyone has the same size hand and therefore cannot possibly have the best experience with a one-size-fits-all approach. 

So, which one do you get? Fortunately, the website offers a handy size chart instructing you to measure your hand from the tip of your middle finger to the bottom of your palm where it joins the wrist, making it the best mouse for wrist pain. 

Up to 16cm and you need a small, between 16 and 18cm and you’ll need a medium. Anything above that is more suited to a large.

We went with a medium that suited our tester and chose the wireless version, which can be purchased for no more than $89 online. The mouse uses a wireless dongle receiver and as far as we could tell we never experienced any lag doing regular tasks like browsing the web, using software, etc.

While some vertical mice have a high DPI and at least are capable of intense gaming, the Penguin isn’t one of them. It reaches a maximum of 1,200, though there’s a switcher at the bottom that you can alter the DPI between 400, 600, 800, and 1,200

The rest of the buttons are slightly different than other ergonomic mice, with the scroll wheel sat horizontally at the front tip. Above it is the front clicker and below it is the right clicker. In that sense, you pull them very much in a trigger motion, regardless of which hand you are using.

If you have carpal tunnel syndrome and want to switch up the way you use the mouse or indeed, just need to choose the best option for left or right-handed use, the button for this is right at the bottom on the front of the device. It looks like a cute penguin bowtie. 

It works with Windows and Mac and is essentially plug-and-play, though some Mac users have said it can sometimes get recognized as a keyboard even though it still controls the cursor. If you’re looking for the best Bluetooth mouse for Mac then you’re out of luck.

So, how comfortable is it, and is the penguin/ joystick/ gun design better? 

We’d argue there’s slightly more twisting required in the wrist but although the front buttons are bang in the middle, they are large enough that you don’t have to reach all the way around to press them. So, there isn’t a massive difference.

The large base is made to slide and is not as cumbersome as it may look, since it’s larger than most. This is a design feature that helps you rest your hand similar to the lip/wings you find on other mice, only the base itself is the rest.

With all that in mind, it does maintain the principle that having your arm in handshake position is more natural than when it’s twisted to have your palm flat. We found it comparable to other vertical mice in its ability to maintain comfort and one of the best we’ve reviewed.

We didn’t test it with any games but for many other tasks, the cursor was precise and responsive. It didn’t take long to get used to the movement and position. Our only qualm is that the scroll wheel isn’t quite sensitive enough, but you can change this in the settings.

Ultimately, this is an extremely comfortable mouse and our top pick for carpal tunnel sufferers. A study by the University of Brighton in the UK, where the mouse was developed, essentially found that it was the most comfortable mouse participants had ever used. They could use it the whole day without discomfort.

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Logitech MX Ergo Wireless Trackball Mouse
Logitech MX Ergo Wireless Trackball Mouse
Logitech MX Ergo Wireless Trackball Mouse

BEST FOR

Ergonomic mouse with a trackball

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  • Horizontal and semi-vertical orientation
  • Trackball functionality
  • Sturdy and well built
  • Up to 4 months battery

The Logitech MX Ergo trackball mouse is an optionally-tilted ergonomic mouse with an added trackball so you can manipulate the cursor with your thumb instead of sliding the mouse itself. Of course, you can still move the mouse in the traditional way if you prefer.

Trackballs are often suited to those with injuries who find it physically difficult to fully move a mouse or who may get tired of doing so. It’s also one of the best mouses for graphic design. This model is our top trackball pick.

It should be noted however the mouse’s tilt is only minor, and its overall shape is more akin to a traditional mouse than a vertical mouse. If you go to its fullest 30-degree tilt, it is more like holding a baseball glove than the handshake of a vertical mouse. But nonetheless, it’s still much more comfortable than your average peripheral.

For those of us without any specific need for ergonomics beyond just wanting to feel a bit more comfortable, the MX Trackball offers a great middle-ground between the traditional/vertical design.

The only downside is that because of the trackball, there’s no proper thumb rest. You’ll find yourself resting your thumb on top of the ball and occasionally slipping, which isn’t the most ergonomic feature.

At an MSRP of $99.99, you need to be sure that this is the type of mouse you require, else there are much better options without the ball.

Since it’s a wireless mouse, you get Logitech’s high-performing USB receiver that uses a 2.4GHz band, meaning no lag whatsoever. This is the same tech they use with their gaming mice, so you know you’re in good hands. If, however, you prefer a Bluetooth mouse for your laptop – that is also an option.

Of course, it’s not the best Logitech wireless mouse on the market, but it’s right up there if ergonomics are important to you. 

Speaking of gaming, you won’t want to use this for a first-person shooter. Its DPI only ranges between 750 and 1,500, but it’s fine for everyday tasks. We didn’t notice any precision or speed issues when using it in a workplace environment. 

Overall, there are 8 buttons, and these can all be mapped via the Logitech software. You have the regular left and right-click buttons, the rubber mouse wheel that can also click inwards, and an up and down DPI shifter (by default) below that. You also get two macro buttons to the left of the left clicker and one more button just above the trackball that activates precision mode. 

This mode slows down or totally blocks the trackball temporarily for tasks that require more precision because at times the trackball can get quite unruly.

Nonetheless, if you like shortcuts and setting things up in your own unique way, which may be needed if you’re suffering certain injuries, Logitech has succeeded here. 

To charge the device or keep it wired you use a USB-C cable. The LED lights will let you know when it’s fully charged. You’re supposed to get around 4 months battery life and although that’s unlikely, you’ll still get long enough for us to praise this aspect.

Overall, at this price, you cannot find a better trackball mouse with added ergonomic tilting. It suits a broad range of users and is considered one of the best mouses for graphic design.

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What Is an Ergonomic Mouse?

An ergonomic mouse is a computer mouse/input device designed specifically with extra comfort and functional features in mind. It allows the user to work (or game) more efficiently for longer hours, without experiencing pain or soreness. If you’re looking for the best laptop mouses, most also can be used with laptops if you have the desk space to accommodate their often larger size. 

Ergonomics typically involves better shapes and sizes, radically different designs – like the vertical mouse, extra buttons and elements, like trackballs and joysticks. There are also thumb rests, as well as support for the left-handed or at least an ambidextrous shape. 

They still perform all the same functions as traditional mice, such as drag and drop, right and left clicking a selection, every typical pointing device gesture, etc.

They suit those with carpal tunnel syndrome, those prone to a repetitive strain injury, and people with poor joints. However, ergonomics can benefit everyone who wants a bit more comfort from their mouse experience.

Like all mice, ergonomic ones can be wired or wireless and suitable for gaming or regular use. Pricing varies from less than $100 to several hundred depending on the quality and your requirements.

While they generally tend to be quieter, if you’re looking for the best silent mouse that’s an entirely different category – though the likes of Logitech and Razer make such devices.

Ergonomic mice are available for PC and Mac users, though the best mouse for PC might not necessarily be the best for Apple operating systems. Apple has its own ‘ergonomic’ offering in the Apple Magic Mouse.

They also tend not to cater to Android or accelerometer mice.

What Are the Different Types of Ergonomic Mice? 

Ergonomic mice come in many different shapes and sizes. Some of the main types and features you will find include:

Vertical

A full vertical or sideways mouse completely changes the flat/turtle shape of a traditional mouse. It turns it into a teardrop shape, with a small top strip and most of the main buttons positioned vertically on the right-hand side. It still remains a point and click cursor device.

This type of pointing device alters the grip from your thumb and pinky finger to what experts consider a more natural handshake grip – your fingers scroll the wheel and press the buttons more like a trigger. The top may support a button or two, joystick, or trackball, while the left-hand side curves in for superior thumb rest and sometimes a few more buttons.

Ultimately this design takes pressure off your wrist and the radius of the forearm. It also reduces the need for you to twist your palm flat, which can cause pain over the long-term and contribute to carpal tunnel syndrome, repetitive strain injury, and general uncomfortableness. 

You still get at least the regular two left and right clickers and triple-click functionality in software that supports it.

Tilt

An excellent middle-ground between a traditional and a vertical mouse – the tilt model. This usually refers to a more traditional looking mouse like the Contour Unimouse that can be adjusted to a more vertical position.

The benefit is that you can alter the position to your personal taste. It is especially worthwhile if you personally don’t like full vertical mice. 

Grip Changer 

A grip changer is one of the more basic styles of ergonomic mouse that simply allows you to change and alter various aspects of the grip. This might expand or reduce the size of the mouse, add or remove padding, create more of a thumb rest, or simply give a different texture.

Grip changers are usually an element added to a traditional mouse, albeit one that’s a bit more shapely and ‘ergonomic’ than a typical cheap variety. Grip changing is also common among gaming mice.  

Left-handed

Not necessarily more ergonomic on its own but if you’re a lefty, an ergo mouse specifically designed for you is obviously going to give you a better experience. A lot of regular mice are symmetrical, and you can reprogram the left and right buttons to suit left-handers. However, in an effort to be slightly more comfortable many manufacturers shape mice slightly more towards the right-handed.

A lot of the other varieties of ergonomic mice provide left-handed versions.

Ambidextrous

An ambidextrous mouse is simply a mouse that works exactly the same whether you are right or left-handed. In the context of ergonomic mice, this may involve adjustments and/or remapping buttons to ensure the most comfortable and functional experience.

Gaming

An ergonomic gaming mouse is typically just more shapely than traditional mice, with extra grip and buttons to make things easier while gaming. They also offer much higher DPI, so the mouse responds quicker and provides a more accurate tracking experience. For example, in shooters, you have a better chance at winning.

There are a few models that take design cues from other ergonomic mice, allowing adjustments, tilts, better thumb rests, and full-blown vertical designs. The latter aren’t widely used in the gaming community because of a belief that it reduces precision. 

Ergonomic gaming mice are more likely to allow button remapping and RGB lighting effects.

Trackball

A trackball is a design element rather than a full ergonomic style of the mouse. It can be found on mice of all types. Simply put, this is a ball usually controlled by the thumb but sometimes the fingers or palm, that moves the cursor across the screen and gives you the so-called six degrees of freedom.

The benefit is that you don’t even have to move the mouse itself when using the ball. A nice feature if your hand is prone to getting tired or you don’t have full mobility in your wrist. It’s also one of the best mouse features for CAD and manipulating three-dimensional graphics.

In 99% of all home ergonomic mice, the trackball is an additional feature controlled on the thumb side or top side of the mouse, while the mouse itself can still be moved as normal and tracked with an optical mouse sensor.

This shouldn’t be confused with the old-fashioned trackball style mice that essentially fell out of favor with home PCs in the early 2000s when they were mainly added to quasi-game controller mice. Trackballs are also commonly found in niche Computer-Aided Design (CAD) workstations.

In our context, trackballs are almost always found as a feature of ergonomic vertical mice. 

Wired and Wireless

Ergonomic mice can be wired or wireless, and like traditional mice, the wired variety are cheaper because there’s less technology involved. All of the wireless solutions we reviewed worked well via Bluetooth or wireless network and we experienced no serious lag.

Wireless mice are best suited to those that already have a lot of wire clutter or want something that is easily portable around the house. Some mice, like the class-leading Logitech MX Master 3 can be connected to three devices at the same time with quick switching between them, making it the best mouse for laptop users.

How to Choose the Best Ergonomic Mouse

Whether you’re choosing from our list or looking further afield there are several things to consider before purchasing an ergonomic mouse, depending on your own requirements.

Budget

Fortunately, mice are on the lower pricing end of computer devices, and being ergonomic doesn’t drastically increase the cost. Nonetheless, you’ll be looking to spend anywhere from $30 for a basic wired ergonomic mouse to $200 for the high-end variety with all the extra features and top performance.

Vertical mice tend to cost more than traditional ones with a few ergonomic design elements. Likewise, gaming mice that require better tracking and DPI speed are often the most expensive. 

Physical Conditions

Do you have any physical conditions or are just looking for a more comfortable mouse? Those with carpal tunnel syndrome, arthritis, repetitive strain injury, and general joint or muscle issues will get on best with a full-blown vertical mouse. It allows your hand, wrist, and arm to be positioned in a more natural way.

Others can get away with tilted or regular mice with better padding and shapes to get a more comfortable experience.

Left or Right-Handed

If you’re left-handed your choices may be limited. What you’re looking for is an ergo mouse with a left-handed option or at the least a symmetrical mouse with the ability to remap buttons.

You can also find mice designed specifically for left-handers. Ambidextrous mice are also purposefully designed for either hand without much messing around to get it to work properly.

Usage Purpose

Other than added comfort, what will you be using your ergonomic mouse for? If it’s long work hours then a vertical mouse is the best option, while a normal one with a thumb lip might be more than enough for casual computer users.

Intense gamers will need to look for mice that are marketed as ergonomic and for gaming to ensure comfort and performance at the same time. 

Wired or Wireless

Whether you go for a wired or wireless mouse is a personal preference as these days you’ll experience little to no lag from a good wireless option. Wireless mice, however, tend to be more expensive but they are also more portable and provide less wire clutter. They will also save you a USB slot. 

Ergonomic Features

Of course, the most obvious things to look out for when trying to choose an ergonomic mouse are the features it provides. Just because something says it’s ergonomic doesn’t necessarily mean it’s the most comfortable thing in the world. You can find very cheap vertical mice but made from bad and uncomfortable materials.

You’ll want to pay close attention to the grip and padding, thumb rest, and adjustability or tilt features, the overall shape, number of buttons, and how many of these are programmable. 

All of those we’ve reviewed meet the comfort test but that’s not to say there aren’t others out there, like the 3M ergonomic mice that we narrowly left off the list.

Wrap Up

With an ever-increasing number of us using computers for work and play comfort is becoming a top priority. Fortunately, ergonomic mice offer a smooth experience and can help those with existing conditions. Whether it’s just a bit shapelier of a design, something for the lefties, a full-blown vertical mouse, or something in between – there’s a solution out there for everyone.

We hope our ergonomic mouse reviews and guides help you find the best option for your needs. The path to complete comfort might be a long one, but we walked half of it for you. Choose wisely!

FAQ

Is an ergonomic mouse worth it?

Although they tend to be more expensive than traditional mice, when compared with other computer accessories and peripherals, ergonomic mice are still very affordable. Only a few models reach the $200+ mark.

If you want a more comfortable experience while working, gaming, or day-to-day computer tasks then an ergonomic mouse is definitely worth it. They allow you to position your hand and wrist, and therefore your entire arm in a more natural position. This prevents strain and helping with existing joint and muscle conditions, repetitive strain injuries, and carpal tunnel syndrome.

Is vertical mouse really better?

Yes and no. A vertical mouse is definitely better in terms of comfort because you don’t have to unnaturally twist your wrist, so your palm is flat for an extended period of time. Think about it, you don’t walk or stand with your palms flat and even if you do when sitting, you’re not actively gripping an object while doing so.

However, if you’re used to traditional computer mice, a vertical mouse will take some getting used to. Even then, it can be a little less precise and slower to use. The latter problems are less likely with more expensive models that have better sensors and higher DPI speeds.

Are vertical mouse good for carpal tunnel?

Yes, vertical mice are known to be a good option for those that suffer from carpal tunnel syndrome – a condition that causes numbness, tingling, and weakness in your hand due to nerve issues in the wrist and base of your palm.

Those that use regular mice find that the unnatural twisting of the wrist so the palm is flat can bring on symptoms requiring regular breaks.

While a vertical mouse isn’t going to stop your condition, it does place the hand in a more comfortable and natural position, allowing you to work longer without symptoms while more easily gripping the mouse if you’re weak.

What is the best mouse to use for carpal tunnel?

Our research puts the British made Posturite Penguin Ambidextrous vertical mouse at the top of the list for carpal tunnel sufferers. Not just because the vertical design produces less strain, but the ability to switch buttons and positions can help.

Bar that, any vertical mouse on our list will help improve your computer experience if you have carpal tunnel. 

If you’re weak and your symptoms are particularly bad on a regular basis, the options with a trackball won’t require you to slide the mouse around at all. You only need to use your thumb to scroll the ball to move the cursor on your display.

How do I choose an ergonomic mouse?

Choosing an ergonomic mouse all depends on why you want it and how you’ll be using it. If you just want a bit of extra comfort, you’ll want to look for shapely regular or tilted mice with good thumb rests – especially if you’re also a gamer. 

For anyone that needs a carpal tunnel mouse or has regular joint or muscle pain, consider vertical mice that allow you to position yourself in a more natural and comfortable manner. Trackballs are especially useful if you can’t even find the strength to slide the mouse itself around.

What is the best ergonomic mouse to use?

If budget is not an issue for you, the ‘Logitech MX Master 3 Advanced Wireless Mouse’ is our overall pick at $200. It is high-end enough to support most gaming and certainly every other day-to-day computer task. Its shape and thumb rest make for a very comfortable experience without radically changing the way the mouse works. It has a bunch of extra features that the other models on our list don’t.

However, when it comes to full-on vertical mice it’s a toss-up between the $100 Logitech MX Vertical, $90 Evoluent VerticalMouse 4, and Posturite Penguin Ambidextrous vertical mouse, which can be found for less than $100. These vertical mice offer superior comfort and perform well in terms of speed and precision, though perhaps not intense gaming.

Overall, the best ergonomic mouse is one that doesn’t cause strain and doesn’t break the bank.