UK Law Updates Will Force Big Tech to Confront Scams

Daniel Attoe
Daniel Attoe

Updated · Mar 09, 2022

SHARE:

Techjury is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.

Companies that fail to follow the incoming laws could face service blockage or hefty fines.

Restricting Shady Online Ads

The UK Government is gearing up to pass new regulations that will force social media platforms and search engines to crack down on fraudulent and scammy ads on their platforms. This follows the introduction of a consultation by the government centering on stricter regulations on online advertising.

The UK is considering proposals on how it can better handle “harmful, fraudulent, and misleading” advertisements. The incoming updates aim at ensuring that platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and Google will exercise tighter control over ads. 

“We want to protect people from online scams and have heard the calls to strengthen our new internet safety laws. These changes to the upcoming Online Safety bill will help stop fraudsters conning people out of their hard-earned cash using fake online adverts,” Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries said in a statement.

The change to the bill has requirements for the top social media platforms and search engines: no fraudulent paid ads.

The government is confident that higher levels of transparency and accountability will play a part in increasing the online trust and confidence of UK citizens.

Enforcement

The Office of Communications (Ofcom) will lay out the finer details of the requirement for the tech companies. These could include:

  • Scanning for scam ads before accepting them
  • Checking the IDs of people who want to make ads
  • Restricting financial promotions to FCA-authorised firms

Ofcom’s duty will include confirming that tech companies have put adequate measures in place to abide by the regulations. As punishment for flouting the upcoming law will include the blocking of services in the UK or up to £18 million (or 10% of turnover) in fines.

SHARE:

Daniel Attoe

Daniel Attoe

Daniel is an Economics grad who fell in love with tech. His love for books and reading pushed him into picking up the pen - and keyboard. Also a data analyst, he's taking that leap into data science and machine learning. When not writing or studying, chances are that you'll catch him watching football or face-deep in an epic fantasy novel.

Leave your comment

Your email address will not be published.